Author:
Bruce Gil

Objectives and key results are great for setting bold goals—your company’s most audacious moonshots. But they can be useful for improving more usual day-to-day work too.

Often when we think of OKRs, we think of big stretch sales goals and the development of game-changing products and services. And sometimes that can make it hard for every member of a company to see how their work can benefit from OKRs. But OKRs are not only useful to marketing, software engineering, and sales teams. They are a tool that anyone can use to make their work more efficient, including those with administrative and operational roles.

A capable and reliable executive assistant or administrative team remains invaluable to senior executives who look to them for support. Efficient admins serve all departments in a business and they enable company-wide success. While poorly-organized admin and operations teams can hold a company back from reaching its full potential.

A well-functioning office is not just nice to have, it is essential. That’s why it’s vital to recognize that there are always ways to improve routine work.

It can be helpful to answer these questions when writing administrative and operational OKRs: Are there processes that could be made simpler? Can turn-around times be shorter? Are there changes or new things that would improve the service that administrative employees offer the company?

OKRs can be used to create and maintain a world-class office experience that leads to better functioning teams and increases the odds that a company reaches their goals. The key is to leverage bottom-up OKRs. Members within a department will know the best way for them to contribute their resources, skills, and time to achieve team and individual goals.

Administrative workers have plenty of insight on how office processes can be improved that are not always brought up in regular business conversations. So it’s crucial to not skip CFRs with administrative employees. A two-way dialogue facilitates transparency and accountability about all things going on in the office.

Like all other OKRs, office administration and operations OKRs should be simple yet inspiring. They should prioritize what is most important and have 3-5 key results max per objective.

Admin teams aren’t working toward a sales goal or developing a product, but they are building something valuable—a functioning and efficient office.

Office Operations OKR Examples

Here are some examples of administrative OKRs:

o
Maintain a world-class office.
kr1
Transfer all company and client records to the cloud.
kr2
Avoid running out of office supplies.
kr3
Reduce spending on office supplies by 10%.
kr4
Implement an online conference room reservation system.
kr5
Choose and launch a new document sharing platform.
o
Develop an excellent company culture.
kr1
Increase employee retention to 90%.
kr2
Implement a new onboarding process.
kr3
Conduct quarterly work satisfaction surveys across the company.
kr4
Reach 95% in average work satisfaction.
kr5
Organize monthly company outings.
o
Maximize executive and office productivity.
kr1
Streamline company approval processes.
kr2
Ensure executives arrive to all scheduled meetings and events on time.
kr3
Ensure executives reach inbox box zero at the end of every week.
kr4
Implement quarterly training for admin staff.

Where can I get more information?

OKRs can help you get more out of your office and staff. Learn more about OKRs by checking out FAQs, Stories, and Resources here on WhatMatters.com.